Vote for my PanelPicker idea! This year I’m determined to present at SXSW. To that end, I’m involved in five (5!) proposals. Two of them are talks, and the rest are panels submitted by other people that, SXSW-gods willing, I will be participating in.

SXSW likes to have the community get involved in deciding what panels will be chosen for the conference, so they use this Panel Picker to let people indicate which ones are of greatest interest. It’s free and easy to register to vote, so please consider voting for these proposals:

While you’re in there, here are some other really interesting panels by some of my friends and colleagues. Please consider voting for these as well!

There are many others that will probably be amazing, and I haven’t even touched on all the ones about the Semantic Web (will have to write a separate post for that), so get started voting now – you only have until September 4th!

When I got back from the Semantic Technology Conference last month, I helped my colleague, Domenic Venuto, write a piece for MinOnline about the things magazine publishers should know about the Semantic Web. I summed up some of the most relevant presentations at SemTech this year, and why I think these things should be important to publishers. Domenic put it all into the context of the work we do with our Media and Entertainment clients, and we worked together to try to express why they should really get moving on this stuff now!

After the article came out, Semantic Universe posted video from a lot of the talks that I mentioned. Very interesting, if you want more detail:

Here’s how I know that SXSW really wants me to propose another talk this year: The email they sent out reminding everyone to submit proposals by Friday, July 10th contains a screenshot of the Panel Picker which includes my name. Twice. So, maybe this year is my year and one of my proposals will get selected. I’ll post details and links when it’s time to vote!

SXSWpanelpicker2

I decided to switch to a look that’s a little less generic. This theme is called “Connections ” and it’s by www.vanillamist.com. I like how it lets you customize the header image. The photo I used is Punchcard taken by Robyn Gallagher and posted to Flickr with a CC-BY license.

More changes to this blog coming soon.

I miss Vindigo. The service that ran this mobile application shut down last September. It was the reason that I had a Palm Treo, and it was totally worth the subscription price. It worked like this: You selected your city (mine’s New York). Then you selected the options you want for a number of different categories – Restaurants, Museums, Music, Shopping, Services… The one I used most was Movies. 

Under Movies, you could see everything that was playing that week, read reviews, and check local theaters and showtimes. Ok, there are lots of sites and services that let you do those things on a mobile phone or smartphone now. Here’s the part I really miss – I could easily save any of the movies to “My List” and then, when I wanted to go see something, instead of having to search for it, or sort through everything currently playing in theaters, I just looked at My List and asked myself “What do I feel like seeing today?”

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paraflowsLast fall I went to a digital arts conference in Vienna called Paraflows. I gave a talk about my personal history, and how it led to me getting into the kind of work that I do (Content Strategy, metadata, semantic web). It’s part personal history, but also touches on the cultural experience of my generation, and how I think it contributed to a lot of what we’re doing and seeing on the web today.

I was quite proud of this talk – it was visual, funny, personal and conversational. It was a different kind of presenation than I usually give, and it provided me an opportunity to evolve my speaking style. It wasn’t perfect, but I was pretty pleased with how it turned out. People had repeatedly suggested that I post the slides on Slideshare, but at the time I could not get speaker notes to disaply, and I didn’t think the talk would make much sense without them.

Well, Slideshare has been working to resolve the mirad issues they were having with that bit of functionality, and yesterday I got notice that it now works for PowerPoint 2007 presentations. So you can now view my talk, A Personal Journey Towards Datameaningfulness, with speaker notes. Don’t be intimidated by the fact that it’s 97 slides. It’s very visual (and you don’t have to read the speaker notes if you don’t want to. You can just flip through and look at the amusing pictures).

NOTE: I just realized that, although the speaker notes are showing up, after the first slides they’re all misaligned (the notes from slide 2 onward are from slides about 8 pages down the line). I have no idea how to fix this. In the meantime, people seem to be enjoying the slideshow anyway.

moot at re:publica '09, photo by christian.pier

moot at re:publica '09, photo by christian.pier

So, moot (founder of 4chan.org) won Time magazine’s audience poll for most influential person. He got over 16 million votes, with an average rating of 90 out of 100 (the next highest rating anyone got was 47). If you’ve never heard of moot, you’re probably wondering how somoene you’ve never heard of can get such a high ranking and so many votes. If you know who he is, or you’re familiar with 4chan, you know that his community is huge, internet savvy and very, very active when it comes to causes they care about. An internet poll is just the place for them to show up in force and make their opinion known.

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